Understanding RVO

Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is a disease that affects the retina, the part of the eye that is responsible for sharp, straight ahead vision. There are two types of RVO, which can lead to severe and sudden vision loss.1,2

Types of RVO

There are two types of RVO: Central RVO (CRVO) and Branch RVO (BRVO)

How Many People Have RVO?

1.1+ million Americans are affected by RVO.3 It is the second most common cause of vision loss due to retinal vascular disease3

  • APPROXIMATELY

    305,000

    AMERICANS HAVE CRVO3

  • APPROXIMATELY

    870,000

    AMERICANS HAVE BRVO3

How Does RVO Affect Your Eye?1,2

Fluid leakage and swelling into the retina can lead to a rapid and sudden loss of vision

Veins in the retina become blocked, restricting normal blood flow

Blocked veins can cause bleeding, fluid leakage and swelling into the retina

Signs and Symptoms1,2

Sudden blurring or vision loss in part of or all of one eye

Temporary loss of central vision

Central and peripheral visual disturbances

Floaters – dark spots or squiggles in central vision

RVO Risk Factors1,2

Age – people 50 or older

High blood pressure

Hardening of the arteries (arteriosclerosis)

Diabetes

Glaucoma

Annual Dilated Eye Exam

Visit an eye doctor for a dilated eye exam. It’s the best way to detect changes in vision.

References

  1. American Academy of Ophthalmology. Central Retinal Vein Occlusion. Available at https://www.aao.org/eye-health/diseases/what-is-central-retinal-vein-occlusion. Accessed March 20, 2017.
  2. American Academy of Ophthalmology. Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion. Available at https://www.aao.org/eye-health/diseases/what-is-branch-retinal-vein-occlusion. Accessed March 20, 2017.
  3. Genentech data on file (Based on population-based studies/the Beaver Dam Eye Study 2000 and 2008 and the United
    States Census)

LUC/032717/0024(1)