We are actively responding to the global COVID-19 pandemic. For more, please visit our COVID-19 response page, or call 1-877-436-3683. See the latest update on Actemra® (tocilizumab) supply here.

Saturday, Dec 11, 2021

Genentech Presents Pivotal Data at ASH 2021 for Novel Cancer Immunotherapy Mosunetuzumab

Results to be presented for the first time show mosunetuzumab induces high and durable complete response rates in people with follicular lymphoma who have received two or more prior therapies

New efficacy data from Genentech’s portfolio of cancer immunotherapies demonstrate potential of bispecific antibodies to expand upon current treatment options across several blood cancers

South San Francisco, CA -- December 11, 2021 --

Genentech, a member of the Roche Group (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY), today announced that new pivotal data on its CD20xCD3 T-cell engaging bispecific antibody, mosunetuzumab, will be presented for the first time at the 63rd American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting & Exposition from December 11-14, 2021.

Emerging data continue to show the promising benefit-risk profile of mosunetuzumab in relapsed or refractory (R/R) follicular lymphoma (FL), a slow-growing, or indolent, form of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Pivotal results from the Phase I/II GO29781 study demonstrated that mosunetuzumab induces durable complete responses lasting at least 18 months in heavily pretreated patients with R/R FL who have received two or more prior therapies, with a 60.0% complete response (CR) rate and a median progression-free survival of 17.9 months (95% CI: 10.1-not evaluable). Median duration of response was 22.8 months among responders (95% CI: 9.7-not evaluable). The most common adverse event (AE) was cytokine release syndrome (CRS), which was generally low grade (mainly Grade 1-2).

“Despite initial successful treatment, many people with follicular lymphoma often experience relapse. Mosunetuzumab could potentially become a highly efficacious treatment option that can be administered without the need for cell collection or genetic engineering,” said Levi Garraway, M.D., Ph.D., chief medical officer and head of Global Product Development. “With mosunetuzumab, we also aim to offer a therapy that can be administered in the outpatient setting to people with this devastating blood cancer.”

Genentech plans to submit the new data to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in the near future for approval consideration. If approved, mosunetuzumab has the potential to be a first-in-class CD20xCD3 T-cell engaging bispecific antibody in NHL. Roche recently submitted the initial marketing authorization application for mosunetuzumab to the European Medicines Agency, with the hope to bring this drug as soon as possible to people with NHL.

Additionally, as part of Genentech’s broad pipeline of hematology immunotherapies and application of novel combinations, key data for the bispecific antibodies mosunetuzumab, glofitamab and cevostamab are being presented, including:

  • Initial results from the Phase Ib CO41942 study of mosunetuzumab in combination with lenalidomide in people with R/R FL who have received at least one prior line of therapy demonstrated encouraging preliminary efficacy and a tolerable safety profile.
  • Data from the Phase Ib/II GO40516 study evaluating mosunetuzumab in combination with Polivy® (polatuzumab vedotin-piiq) showed promising efficacy and favorable safety in heavily pretreated patients with aggressive R/R NHL with an objective response rate (ORR) of 65.0% and a CR rate of 48.3%. CRS occurred in 18% of patients, and all events occurred in Cycle 1 and were Grade 1-2.
  • A Phase I/Ib NP30179 dose-escalation study evaluating glofitamab as a monotherapy and in combination with Gazyva® (obinutuzumab) following pretreatment with Gazyva in patients with R/R B-cell NHL showed promising activity in both R/R FL and R/R mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), an uncommon but aggressive form of lymphoma with poor prognosis for those who progress.
    • Preliminary results in heavily pretreated patients with R/R FL showed high response rates across all treatment groups, including high-risk subgroups, with an ORR of 81.0% for the glofitamab monotherapy group and an ORR of 100% for the glofitamab plus Gazyva combination therapy group. For patients with R/R MCL treated with glofitamab monotherapy following Gazyva pretreatment, the ORR was 81.0%. Across both studies, the most common AE was CRS, with the majority of events being low grade (Grade 1-2).
  • Results of the Phase Ib/II NP39488 study of glofitamab in combination with Polivy demonstrated encouraging preliminary efficacy and a tolerable safety profile in people with difficult-to-treat R/R diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. With a median follow up of 3.2 months (95% CI: 1.4-3.5), an ORR of 73.0% was observed with a 51.5% CR rate, with patients showing durable responses at ≥6 months. No Grade 3 or higher CRS events were observed, and the safety profile of the combination was consistent with that of the individual medicines.
  • Data from the Phase I GO39775 dose-escalation and expansion study investigating cevostamab in heavily pretreated patients with R/R multiple myeloma (MM) showed the first-of-its kind FcRH5xCD3 bispecific antibody induced clinically meaningful, target dose-dependent increases in ORR without an increase in the rate of CRS, with an ORR of 54.5% in the 160 mg dose group. Results from double step-up dosing suggest this approach could help mitigate CRS and potentially improve the safety profile compared to single step-up dosing.

Our investigational cancer immunotherapies, mosunetuzumab and glofitamab, are T-cell engaging bispecific antibodies designed to engage with CD3 on the T cell and CD20 on the tumor cell, bringing them close in proximity and enabling the T cell to eliminate the tumor cell. Although these bispecific antibodies have similar modes of action, they differ in their structure and clinical profiles. Cevostamab, another investigational T-cell engaging bispecific antibody, is designed to target FcRH5 on myeloma cells and CD3 on T cells and is currently being evaluated in people living with R/R MM.

Genentech’s broad and comprehensive clinical development program will continue to evaluate mosunetuzumab, glofitamab and cevostamab as monotherapies and in combination with other established and/or novel therapies for malignant hematological conditions with the goal of providing treatment solutions tailored to the patient journey for each disease.

Keep up to date with ASH 2021 news and updates by using the hashtag #ASH21 and follow Genentech on Twitter via @Genentech and on LinkedIn.

About Genentech’s Investigational Bispecifics in Hematology
Genentech is currently developing two T-cell engaging bispecific antibodies, mosunetuzumab and glofitamab, designed to target CD20 on the surface of B cells and CD3 on the surface of T cells. This dual targeting activates and redirects a patient’s existing T cells to engage and eliminate target B cells by releasing cytotoxic proteins into the B cells. Mosunetuzumab and glofitamab differ in their structures, and both are being developed by Genentech as part of our ongoing strategy to explore multiple bispecific formats, to identify those that maximize potential clinical benefits for patients. Mosunetuzumab has a structure similar to that of a natural human antibody in that it has two ‘Fab’ regions, but is different from naturally-occurring antibodies in that one ‘Fab’ region targets CD20 and the other ‘Fab’ region targets CD3. Glofitamab is based on a novel structural format which we call ‘2:1’, which refers to the structure of the antibody. It is engineered to have two ‘Fab’ regions that bind to CD20 and one ‘Fab’ region that binds to CD3. The clinical development programs for mosunetuzumab and glofitamab include ongoing investigations of these molecules as monotherapies and in combination with other medicines for the treatment of people with CD20-positive B cell (non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas), including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and follicular lymphoma (FL).

About Cevostamab (FcRH5xCD3 Bispecific Antibody)
Cevostamab (BFCR4350A) is an FcRH5xCD3 T-cell engaging bispecific antibody designed to target FcRH5 on myeloma cells and CD3 on T cells. FcRH5 is a unique and differentiated target, expressed on nearly all myeloma cells. Cevostamab has a structure similar to that of a natural human antibody in that it has two ‘Fab’ regions, but is different from naturally-occurring antibodies in that one ‘Fab’ region targets FcRH5 and the other ‘Fab’ region targets CD3. This dual targeting activates and re-directs a patient’s existing T cells to engage and eliminate target FcRH5-expressing myeloma cells by releasing cytotoxic proteins into the myeloma cells.

About the GO29781 Study
The GO29781 study [NCT02500407] is a Phase I/II, multicenter, open-label, dose-escalation study evaluating the safety and pharmacokinetics of mosunetuzumab in people with relapsed or refractory B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Outcome measures include complete response rate (best response) by independent review facility (primary endpoint), objective response rate, duration of response, progression-free survival, and safety and tolerability (secondary endpoints).

Polivy U.S. Indication
Polivy is a prescription medicine used with other medicines, bendamustine and a rituximab product, to treat diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in adults who have progressed after at least two prior therapies.

The accelerated approval of Polivy is based on a type of response rate. There are ongoing studies to confirm the clinical benefit of Polivy.

Important Safety Information
Possible serious side effects
Everyone reacts differently to Polivy therapy, so it’s important to know what the side effects are. Some people who have been treated with Polivy have experienced serious to fatal side effects. A patient’s doctor may stop or adjust a patient’s treatment if any serious side effects occur. Patients must contact their healthcare team if there are any signs of these side effects.

  • Nerve problems in arms and legs: This may happen as early as after the first dose and may worsen with every dose. If a patient already has nerve pain, Polivy may make it worse. The patient’s doctor will monitor for signs and symptoms, such as changes in sense of touch, numbness or tingling in hands or feet, nerve pain, burning sensation, any muscle weakness, or changes to walking patterns
  • Infusion-related reactions: A patient may experience fever, chills, rash, breathing problems, low blood pressure, or hives within 24 hours of the infusion
  • Infections: Patients should contact their healthcare team if they experience a fever of 100.4°F or higher, chills, cough, or pain during urination. Also, a patient’s doctor may give medication before giving Polivy, which may prevent some infections, and monitor blood counts throughout treatment with Polivy. Treatment with Polivy can cause severe low blood cell counts
  • Rare and serious brain infections: A patient’s doctor will monitor the patient closely for signs and symptoms of these types of infections. Patients should contact their doctor if they experience confusion, dizziness or loss of balance, trouble talking or walking, or vision changes
  • Tumor lysis syndrome: Caused by the fast breakdown of cancer cells. Signs include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and lack of energy
  • Potential harm to liver: Some signs include tiredness, weight loss, pain in the abdomen, dark urine, and yellowing of the skin or the white part of the eyes. Patients may be at higher risk if they already have liver problems or are taking other medication

Side effects seen most often
The most common side effects during treatment were:

  • Low blood cell counts (platelets, red blood cells, white blood cells)
  • Nerve problems in arms and legs
  • Tiredness or lack of energy
  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea
  • Fever
  • Decreased appetite
  • Infections

Polivy may not be for everyone. A patient should talk to their doctor if they are:

  • Pregnant or may be pregnant: Data have shown that Polivy may harm an unborn baby
  • Planning to become pregnant: Women should avoid getting pregnant while taking Polivy. Women should use effective contraception during treatment and for at least 3 months after their last Polivy treatment. Men taking Polivy should use effective contraception during treatment and for at least 5 months after their last Polivy treatment
  • Breastfeeding: Women should not breastfeed while taking Polivy and for at least 2 months after the last dose

These may not be all the side effects. Patients should talk to their healthcare provider for more information about the benefits and risks of Polivy treatment.

Report side effects to the FDA at (800) FDA-1088 or http://www.fda.gov/medwatch. Report side effects to Genentech at (888) 835-2555.

Please visit http://www.Polivy.com for the full Prescribing Information for additional Important Safety Information.

Gazyva U.S. Indication
Gazyva is a prescription medicine used with the chemotherapy drug, bendamustine, followed by Gazyva alone for follicular lymphoma (FL) in adults who did not respond to a rituximab-containing regimen, or whose FL returned after such treatment.

Important Safety Information
The most important safety information patients should know about Gazyva
Patients must tell their doctor right away about any side effects they experience. Gazyva can cause side effects that can become serious or life-threatening, including:

  • Hepatitis B Virus (HBV): Hepatitis B can cause liver failure and death. If a patient has a history of hepatitis B infection, Gazyva could cause it to return. Patients should not receive Gazyva if they have active hepatitis B liver disease. The patient’s doctor or healthcare team will need to screen them for hepatitis B before, and monitor the patient for hepatitis during and after treatment with Gazyva. Sometimes this will require treatment for hepatitis B. Symptoms of hepatitis include: worsening of fatigue and yellow discoloration of skin or eyes
  • Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML): PML is a rare and serious brain infection caused by a virus. PML can be fatal. If a patient has a weakened immune system, it could put them at risk. The patient’s doctor will watch for symptoms. Symptoms of PML include: confusion, difficulty talking or walking, dizziness or loss of balance, and vision problems

Who should not receive Gazyva:

  • Patients should NOT receive Gazyva if they have had an allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis or serum sickness) to Gazyva. Patients must contact their healthcare team if they have had an allergic reaction to obinutuzumab or any other ingredients in Gazyva in the past

Additional possible serious side effects of Gazyva:
Patients must tell their healthcare team right away about any side effect they experience. Gazyva can cause side effects that may become severe or life-threatening, including:

  • Infusion-related reactions (IRRs): These side effects may occur during or within 24 hours of any Gazyva infusion. Some IRRs can be serious, including, but not limited to, severe allergic reactions (anaphylaxis), acute life-threatening breathing problems, or other life-threatening IRRs. If the patient has a reaction, the infusion is either slowed or stopped until their symptoms are resolved. Most patients are able to complete infusions and receive medication again. However, if the IRR is life-threatening, the infusion of Gazyva will be permanently stopped. The patient’s healthcare team will take steps to help lessen any side effects the patient may have to the infusion process. The patient may be given medicines to take before each Gazyva treatment. Symptoms of IRRs may include: fast heartbeat, tiredness, dizziness, headache, redness of the face, nausea, chills, fever, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, high blood pressure, low blood pressure, difficulty breathing, and chest discomfort
  • Hypersensitivity reactions including serum sickness: Some patients receiving Gazyva may have severe or life-threatening allergic reactions. This reaction may be severe, may happen during or after an infusion, and may affect many areas of the body. If an allergic reaction occurs, the patient’s doctor will stop the infusion and permanently discontinue Gazyva
  • Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS): Tumor lysis syndrome, including fatal cases, has been reported in patients receiving Gazyva. Gazyva works to break down cancer cells quickly. As cancer cells break apart, their contents are released into the blood. These contents may cause damage to organs and the heart, and may lead to kidney failure requiring the need for dialysis treatment. The patient’s doctor may prescribe medication to help prevent TLS. The patient’s doctor will also conduct regular blood tests to check for TLS. Symptoms of TLS may include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and tiredness
  • Infections: While the patient is taking Gazyva, they may develop infections. Some of these infections may be fatal and severe, so the patient should be sure to talk to their doctor if they think they have an infection. Patients administered Gazyva in combination with chemotherapy, followed by Gazyva alone, are at a high risk of infections during and after treatment. Patients with a history of recurring or chronic infections may be at an increased risk of infection. Patients with an active infection should not be treated with Gazyva. Patients taking Gazyva plus bendamustine may be at higher risk for fatal or severe infections compared to patients taking Gazyva plus CHOP or CVP
  • Low white blood cell count: When the patient has an abnormally low count of infection-fighting white blood cells, it is called neutropenia. While the patient is taking Gazyva, their doctor will do blood work to check their white blood cell count. Severe and life-threatening neutropenia can develop during or after treatment with Gazyva. Some cases of neutropenia can last for more than one month. If the patient’s white blood cell count is low, their doctor may prescribe medication to help prevent infections
  • Low platelet count: Platelets help stop bleeding or blood loss. Gazyva may reduce the number of platelets the patient has in their blood; having low platelet count is called thrombocytopenia. This may affect the clotting process. While the patient is taking Gazyva, their doctor will do blood work to check their platelet count. Severe and life-threatening thrombocytopenia can develop during treatment with Gazyva. Fatal bleeding events have occurred in patients treated with Gazyva. If the patient’s platelet count gets too low, their treatment may be delayed or reduced

The most common side effects seen with Gazyva in a study that included relapsed or refractory FL patients were infusion-related reactions, fatigue, low white blood cell counts, cough, upper respiratory tract infection, and joint or muscle pain.

Before receiving Gazyva, patients should talk to their doctor about:

  • Immunizations: Before receiving Gazyva therapy, the patient should tell their healthcare provider if they have recently received or are scheduled to receive a vaccine. Patients who are treated with Gazyva should not receive live vaccines
  • Pregnancy: The patient should tell their doctor if they are pregnant, think that they might be pregnant, or plan to become pregnant. Gazyva may harm a patient’s unborn baby. The patient should speak to their healthcare team about using Gazyva while they are pregnant. The patient should talk to their doctor or their child’s doctor about the safety and timing of live virus vaccinations to their infant if they received Gazyva during pregnancy. Women of childbearing potential should use effective contraception while taking Gazyva and for 6 months after their Gazyva treatment
  • Breastfeeding: Because of the potential risk of serious side reactions in breastfed children, women should not breastfeed while taking Gazyva and for 6 months after their last dose

Patients should tell their doctor about any side effects.

These are not all of the possible side effects of Gazyva. For more information, patients should ask their doctor or pharmacist.

Gazyva is available by prescription only.

Report side effects to the FDA at (800) FDA-1088, or http:// www.fda.gov/medwatch. Report side effects to Genentech at (888) 835-2555.

Please visit http://www.Gazyva.com for the Gazyva full Prescribing Information, including BOXED WARNINGS, for additional Important Safety Information.

About Genentech in Hematology
For more than 20 years, Genentech has been developing medicines with the goal to redefine treatment in hematology. Today, we’re investing more than ever in our effort to bring innovative treatment options to people with diseases of the blood. For more information visit http://www.gene.com/hematology.

About Genentech
Founded more than 40 years ago, Genentech is a leading biotechnology company that discovers, develops, manufactures and commercializes medicines to treat patients with serious and life-threatening medical conditions. The company, a member of the Roche Group, has headquarters in South San Francisco, California. For additional information about the company, please visit http://www.gene.com.

# # #